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    Something Revealed: California Women Artists Emerge, 1860-1960, Saturday, September 29, 2018 12:00 pm Something Revealed: California Women Artists Emerge, 1860-1960, Saturday, September 29, 2018 12:00 pm
    Something Revealed: California Women Artists Emerge, 1860-1960 September 29, 2018 - March 31, 2019
    12:00 pm–5:00 pm
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    Something Revealed: California Women Artists Emerge, 1860-1960

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    12:00pm–5:00pm

    Historically marginalized? Relegated to “Sunday painters”? Encouraged to paint or sculpt children, still-lifes, puppies, kittens, ducklings, and a random landscape? Pasadena Museum of History's exhibition Something Revealed; California Women Artists Emerge, 1860-1960 stands to dispel the misconception that women were limited in their subject matter and demonstrates that women, especially here in California, have historically made their mark in a male-dominated world. 

    Even today, the role of men in the annals of art history frequently overshadows the artistic accomplishments made by women. The exhibition will show a long history of excellence in female-created art and prove that women could and did contribute to the evolution of style, technique, and exploration in the world of art.

    This exhibition of more than 200 pieces showcases just a fraction of the countless number of women who were working in the arts beginning in the mid-nineteenth century in California. Focusing on works produced between the mid-1800s through the 1950s, the exhibition presents an eclectic array of oil paintings, works on paper, ceramics, metal craft, textiles, and sculpture. Curated by Maurine St. Gaudens and accompanied by her four volume book, Emerging from the Shadows; A Survey of Women Artists Working in California, 1860-1960, this exhibition will stimulate conversations and shatter any preconceived notions of the limitations of art created by women.

    Phase I runs from September 29, 2018 through January 13, 2019; Phase II opens January 20 and runs through March 31, 2019. The exhibition will be closed January 14-19. 

    Galleries are open Wednesdays-Sundays, 12 noon to 5:00pm.

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    Sara Kathryn Arledge: Serene for the Moment, Sunday, January 27, 2019 Sara Kathryn Arledge: Serene for the Moment, Sunday, January 27, 2019
    Sara Kathryn Arledge: Serene for the Moment January 27, 2019 - May 12, 2019
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    Sara Kathryn Arledge: Serene for the Moment

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    The Armory Center for the Arts is pleased to present Sara Kathryn Arledge: Serene for the Moment from January 27 through May 12, 2019 in the Armory’s Caldwell Gallery.  The exhibition has been organized by Irene Tsatsos, the Armory’s Director of Exhibition Programs/Chief Curator.  It will be preceded by a free, public reception on January 26 from 7-9pm. Major support for the exhibition comes from the Pasadena Art Alliance, with special thanks to the Sara Kathryn Arledge Memorial Trust. An under-recognized painter and innovator of mid-20th century experimental cinema, Sara Kathryn Arledge (1911-1998) was a prolific artist who emphasized the eerie in the mundane and the disorienting in the beautiful.

    Defying convention and authority, Arledge created a diverse and experimental body of work in between film and painting. “My plan,” she said, ‘was to extend the nature of painting to include time.” One of her earliest influences was a performance by Thomas Wilfred, on his Clavilux, at the Pasadena Playhouse, which she saw in 1928 as a teenager.

    As a filmmaker Arledge is considered a pioneer of ciné-dance (dance made uniquely for and by the medium of film) combining avant-garde dance with film editing techniques to “add time to painting.”

    The exhibition will include Arledge’s seven films and hand-painted glass slides, which are held by the Pacific Film Archive (PFA) in Berkeley and only recently digitized. It will also include over 80 of her brilliant works on paper, which span six decades, as well as ephemera and archival material, including storyboards for dance-films.

     

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    Sandra de la Loza: Mi Casa Es Su Casa, Sunday, January 27, 2019 Sandra de la Loza: Mi Casa Es Su Casa, Sunday, January 27, 2019
    Sandra de la Loza: Mi Casa Es Su Casa January 27, 2019 - May 12, 2019
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    Sandra de la Loza: Mi Casa Es Su Casa

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    The Armory Center for the Arts is pleased to present Sandra de la Loza: Mi Casa Es Su Casa from January 27 through May 14, 2019 in the Armory’s Mezzanine Gallery. In Mi Casa Es Su Casa, the artist alters and intervenes on photographs of her own family to address issues of power, memory, and history through the concept of home. The exhibition is organized by Irene Tsatsos, Director of Exhibition Programs/Chief Curator.

    Growing up in sunny Southern California, de la Loza remembers that life was not always easy. Yet, in photo albums taken amidst white flight, her Mexican American family mimics a post-war ideal of what a happy, suburban American family should look like. According to the artist,  Mi Casa Es Su Casa aims to suggest the looming social and personal inequities that lay beneath “those perfect lawns and the stiff taffeta.

    By obscuring, and replacing the bodies and faces in the photographs, de la Loza calls attention to how the familiar elements of the family snapshot—the landscape, architecture, pose, and fashion—conceal embedded dynamics of race, class, and gender. According to Tsatsos, “Sandra calls out the private dramas that family photographs inadvertently reveal—the strains, the desires, and the discrepancies between the outward appearances of familiar togetherness and the complex, perhaps conflicted nature of the relationships among the subjects, along with the social context within which they perform.”

    Presented at the Armory as four immersive installations, Mi Casa Es Su Casa highlights a tension that continues into our contemporary moment, where increasingly difficult living conditions coincide with the pressure, especially via social media, to present a cheerful and fulfilled public image.

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