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    Starting Anew: Transforming Pasadena 1890 – 1930, Wednesday, November 13, 2019 Starting Anew: Transforming Pasadena 1890 – 1930, Wednesday, November 13, 2019
    Starting Anew: Transforming Pasadena 1890 – 1930 November 13, 2019 - July 3, 2020
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    Starting Anew: Transforming Pasadena 1890 – 1930

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    Pasadena Museum of History presents Starting Anew: Transforming Pasadena 1890 – 1930, an exhibition that explores the city’s private and public sector development by examining themes such as: Why did people come to Pasadena? Why did they choose to stay? Where did they live and what did they see and do? What local, national, or international influences served as a catalyst for the city’s remarkable transformation? Visitors can see historic images, documents, artwork, clothing, and ephemera, and research compiled over decades by scholars, PMH staff, and volunteers. 

    The 40 years between 1890 and 1930 were a dynamic time in Pasadena’s history. The area changed rapidly from a small agricultural community to a renowned winter resort and bustling young city. Newcomers came for many reasons. They were taken by the region’s natural beauty and the opportunities associated with its growth and potential. It was an appealing place to launch a new venture, or in some cases, to start over. The railroad provided convenient and affordable transportation to the appropriately nicknamed “Crown City.” Luxurious resort hotels sprung up and a town grew, providing opportunities for real estate investments and starting commercial and service businesses. Pasadena was changing significantly, fashioned by a rapidly burgeoning population and its hopes, dreams, and achievements.

    The exhibition also features the legacy of Museum benefactors Eva and Aldalbert Fenyes. After arriving in Pasadena as newlyweds in 1896, this sophisticated couple quickly embraced the city as their new home. They purchased real estate, developed businesses, and contributed to the cultural and artistic development of Pasadena. Their 1906 Beaux Arts mansion is an important component of the exhibit storyline, providing visitors with a glimpse into what life was like on Pasadena’s landmark Millionaire’s Row in the early 1900s.

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    Trudie Strobel: A Life in Tapestry, Saturday, December 14, 2019 Trudie Strobel: A Life in Tapestry, Saturday, December 14, 2019
    Trudie Strobel: A Life in Tapestry December 14, 2019 - March 1, 2020
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    Trudie Strobel: A Life in Tapestry

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    The Armory Center for the Arts shares the art and life story of Holocaust survivor Trudie Strobel with its exhibition Trudie Strobel: A Life in Tapestry. The opening reception is Sunday, December 15 from 3:00-5:00pm. All are welcome. 

    While Trudie began stitching to process the story of her survival, her experiences as a child of the pogroms (Russia) and then the Nazis, she continued stitching until she had created vast tapestries of the history of the Jewish people. Curators Maya Savin Miller and Lila Dworsky-Hickey have created an exhibition that displays these tapestries in hope of sparking greater interest and knowledge about genocide. The viewing of Trudie’s work and a telling of her story provide the opportunity to expose more people to this visceral form of genocide education. Ultimately, we strive to foster greater awareness and empathy as individuals see the Holocaust through the personal eyes of a survivor’s artwork. And as the horrors of oppression and genocide have continued to impact many other cultures and people throughout the world, it is more important than ever that our awareness be a call to action.  

    This project is supported by the Dragon Kim Foundation, the Righteous Conversations Project, and the Remember Us Project.

     

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    Tanya Aguiñiga: The Uplifter Creating Bridges Across the Border, Sunday, February 9, 2020 Tanya Aguiñiga: The Uplifter Creating Bridges Across the Border, Sunday, February 9, 2020
    Tanya Aguiñiga: The Uplifter Creating Bridges Across the Border February 9, 2020 - June 14, 2020
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    Tanya Aguiñiga: The Uplifter Creating Bridges Across the Border

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    Drawing from the lived experience of the US/Mexico border, Tanya Aguiñiga has developed an experimental approach to craft, using fiber, ceramics, hand-blown glass, and traditional techniques to generate conversations about and across political and cultural divides. Given the ongoing persecution of migrants along the border, and amid an increasingly polarized political climate, Aguiñiga’s Armory Center exhibition highlights her long-standing commitment to thoughtful and urgent dialogue on immigration politics, transnational identity, and community activism. Along with the Los Angeles debut of some of the artist’s most iconic works, including the bi-national border-epic AMBOS, this exhibition will also feature a site-specific commission that repurposes the Armory’s soaring ceilings as an immense, community-activated loom.

    Join the Armory for an opening reception with the artist on Saturday, February 8, from 6:00 to 8:00 PM. The reception is free and open to everyone. 

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    John Ziqiang Wu: Art Making, Sunday, February 9, 2020 John Ziqiang Wu: Art Making, Sunday, February 9, 2020
    John Ziqiang Wu: Art Making February 9, 2020 - March 29, 2020
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    John Ziqiang Wu: Art Making

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    John Ziqiang Wu’s exhibition at the Armory Center explores the spaces that have played a role in his development as an artist, the teachings that inform his role as an educator, and the fluidity of the relationship between student and teacher and personal and institutional space.

    Wu founded Learning Art and Art Learning Studio in 2014, a workshop he runs primarily from his home studio in Chino, California, where he teaches art to students ranging from children to adults. This collapsing of domestic, artistic, and educational space, all existing as one, mirrors the false boundaries he perceives between the relationship of teacher and learner. Wu came to question the function of art and art education after years of working as an artist and educator, especially as his perception of these roles broke from the mold forged during his own art training. He weaves these investigations into an art practice that includes drawing, painting, installation, performance, and storytelling.

    Wu’s exhibition in the Armory’s Mezzanine gallery is inclusive of an installation that examines Wu’s teaching methods, the work of his students, and widely accepted institutional pedagogies; a series of watercolor paintings of diagrammatic illustrations that reveal Wu’s ruminations; a collection of self-published books that weave whimsical observations and fantastic interpretations of everyday narratives with emotional personal reflections; and an installation that reflects on his home studio where he works, lives, and teaches.

    The Armory hosts an opening reception with the artist on Saturday, February 8, from 6:00 to 8:00 PM. The reception is free and open to everyone. Armory galleries are open daily 12:00 to 5:00 PM (closed Tuesdays and holidays). Admission is always free. Donations are appreciated.

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